FERTILIZER FROM WEEDS AND YARD TRIMMINGS

Ingredients: Weeds, yard trimmings, mowed grass, water.

Equipment required: 5(Five) gallon bucket– or larger vessel if you want a really big batch of fertilizer.

Steeping time: 4(Four) Weeks.

Procedure:

  • Pick newly pulled weeds from your garden– trimmings, for example, tomato suckers act as well– and put a couple of modest bunches in your five-gallon bucket.
  • Fill it whatever remains of the route up with water, and abandon it to soak for the allotted time.
  • The soaking procedure is best done outside, as it can get somewhat rotten.
  • Whenever prepared, apply to the soil at the base of your plants.

FERTILIZER FROM VEGETABLE SCRAPS

Ingredients: Vegetable scraps, Epsom salt, ammonia (optional), water.

Equipment required: Blender, five gallon bucket.

Steeping time: 24(Twenty-four) hours.

Procedure:

  • Begin by sparing all your cooked or crude vegetable scraps.
  • Save them in the freezer until the point when you have a few quarts’ worth. (You can also spare the water from boiling pasta or vegetables, which is additionally a decent source of nutrients.)
  • To make the “scrap puree” which will frame the base for your manure, defrost your solidified scraps and puree them in a blender with enough water to make a smooth consistency.
  • Empty the pureed scraps into your large bucket. For each blender-full of puree, include 1/2 tsp Epson salt and one capful of ammonia to the container.
  • Repeat this procedure until the point when every one of your pieces is pureed.
  • Blend the container and let it sit overnight.
  • To mix up a cluster of liquid fertilizer, add one quart of puree to one gallon of warm water, and shake to blend.
  • Apply to the soil at the base of your plants.

FERTILIZER FROM MANURE

Ingredients: Manure of your choice, water.

Equipment required: Five gallon bucket– or larger vessel if you want a really big batch of fertilizer.

Steeping time: Four weeks.

Procedure:

  • If you live in a horticultural area, or on the off chance that you have domesticated animals of your own, you can make really remarkable liquid compost from animal’s excrement.
  • This procedure is unquestionably best done outside.
  • The procedure is the same with respect to the above recipe– a can, some water, and a shovelful of manure, soak for a month and apply to the soil at the base of your plants.
  • In spite of the fact that it may sound disgusting, fertilizer is unimaginably high in nitrogen, and a definitive “waste” item.
  • Finding an utilization for the stuff is extremely rewarding.